Jan 18-19 2018

Regional Perspectives on Migration and Refugees

Columbia University, Kellogg Center, 1512 International Affairs Building
Past Event

Overview

Regional Perspectives on Migration and Refugees

18-19 January 2018
Kellogg Center, 1512 International Affairs Building, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA

This conference on the transnational issues of migration and forced migration takes a comparative approach that considers the European, Eurasian, and North American cases.

The event will bring migration experts from Russia and the post-Soviet region together with those in the Columbia community and the wider New York area. The objective is to discuss and learn from various experiences, including across regions, as well as across the fields of migration and refugee studies, in order to develop policy recommendations. The full-day conference will include panel discussions on the following themes: security dimensions (including interethnic conflict); economic dimensions (including employment and integration); human rights dimensions; and institutional effectiveness.

The keynote address will be delivered by Michael Doyle, Director of the Columbia Global Policy Initiative and University Professor at Columbia University, who is leading the development of the Model International Mobility Convention. The full-day conference will consist of a series of panel discussions on these themes, resulting in a final policy recommendation memo based on the research and observations of participating experts on migration and refugee issues in their respective regions.

For more information, visit harriman.columbia.edu/event/conference-regional-perspectives-migration-and-refugees

Read and sign the Model International Mobility Convention at globalpolicy.columbia.edu/mobility-convention.

Agenda

Regional Perspectives on Migration and Refugees Conference

Harriman Institute, Columbia University
18-19 January 2018
Kellogg Center, 1512 International Affairs Building
Thursday, January 18

6:00 pm Keynote Address by Michael Doyle, Director of the Columbia Global Policy Initiative and University Professor at Columbia University

Friday, January 19

10:00 am Introductory Remarks by Jack Snyder, Robert and Renee Belfer Professor of International Relations at Columbia University

10:15 am Panel on Economic Dimensions, moderated by Daniel Naujoks, Professor at Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs and Columbia Law School

  • Andre Correa d’Almeida, Professor at Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs
  • Saskia Sassen, Robert S. Lynd Professor of Sociology and Co-Chair of the Committee on Global Thought at Columbia University
  • Irina Ivakhnyuk, Member of Global Migration Policy Associates, Professor Emeritus at Moscow State University

11:45 am Panel on Human Rights Dimensions, moderated by Carolyn Horn, Senior Advisor to Dr. Agnes Callamard on her report to the UN General Assembly on Unlawful Death of Migrants and Refugees

  • Clara Long, Senior Researcher on immigration and border policy with the United States program at Human Rights Watch
  • Neil Boothby, Professor at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, former Director of the Program on Forced Migration and Health
  • Irina Kuznetsova, Birmingham Fellow at University of Birmingham School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences

2:00 pm Remarks by Alexander Cooley, Director of the Harriman Institute at Columbia University, Claire Tow Professor of Political Science at Barnard College

2:15 pm Panel on Security Dimensions, moderated by Edward Lemon, Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Political Science, Columbia University

  • Nancy Hiemstra, Assistant Professor of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Stony Brook University
  • Ariane Chebel d’Appollonia, Professor at the School of Public Affairs and Administration, Rutgers University
  • Emil Nasritdinov, Associate Professor of Anthropology at American University of Central Asia (Bishkek)

3:45 pm Panel on Institutional Effectiveness, moderated by Sarah Calderone, Master’s Candidate at Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs

  • Els de Graauw, Associate Professor of Political Science at Baruch College, City University of New York
  • Andrei Korobkov, Professor of Political Science and International Relations at Middle Tennessee University

Support for this event is provided by a grant from the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

Background Materials

The Model International Mobility Convention

While people are as mobile as they ever were in our globalized world, the movement of people across borders lacks global regulation. This leaves many refugees in protracted displacement and many migrants unprotected in irregular and dire situations. Meanwhile, some states have become concerned that their borders have become irrelevant. International mobility—the movement of individuals across borders for any length of time as visitors, students, tourists, labor migrants, entrepreneurs, long-term residents, asylum seekers, or refugees—has no common definition or legal framework. To address this key gap in international law, and the growing gaps in protection and responsibility that are leaving people vulnerable, the "Model International Mobility Convention" proposes a framework for mobility with the goals of reaffirming the existing rights afforded to mobile people (and the corresponding rights and responsibilities of states) as well as expanding those basic rights where warranted.

In 213 articles divided over eight chapters, the Convention establishes both the minimum rights afforded to all people who cross state borders as visitors, and the special rights afforded to tourists, students, migrant workers, investors and residents, forced migrants, refugees, migrant victims of trafficking and migrants caught in countries in crisis. Some of these categories are covered by existing international legal regimes. However, in this Convention these groups are for the first time brought together under a single framework. An essential feature of the Convention is that it is cumulative. This means, for the most part, that the chapters build on and add rights to the set of rights afforded to categories of migrants covered by earlier chapters. The Convention contains not only provisions that afford rights to migrants and, to a lesser extent, States (such as the right to decide who can enter and remain in their territory). It also articulates the responsibilities of migrants vis-à-vis States and the rights and responsibilities of different institutions that do not directly respond to a right held by migrants. 

The Model International Mobility Convention was developed by a Commission of eminent academic and policy experts in the fields on migration, human rights, national security, labor economics and refugee law. The Commission came together to debate and develop the Convention in workshops conducted regularly from spring 2015 until it was finalized in June 2017. A full list of Commission and other signatories to the Convention can be found further down on this page. 

Read and sign the Model International Mobility Convention at globalpolicy.columbia.edu/mobility-convention.