Undergraduate Student Fellowships

Undergraduate Global Policy Fellowship

Summary

Summary

Thank you for your interest in the Undergraduate Global Policy Fellowship. The program has closed. Please visit ogp.columbia.edu/fellowships for more information on global fellowships offered at Columbia University. 

The Columbia Global Policy Initiative (CGPI) is proud to have supported the Undergraduate Global Policy Fellowship for juniors who sought to conduct policy-oriented research for their senior theses. Having supported 24 undergraduates over the past three years with support from The Endeavor Foundation and The Lenfest Group, this fellowship was designed to encourage research that is truly global in nature, addressing problems that impact not just one country or region, but that reflect the challenges of our globalized world. Average awards were $3,000-$4,000 per fellow, and used for domestic or international research. Eligible senior thesis projects were research-based (including but not limited to fieldwork or laboratory research); global in nature (having cross-border origins, consequences, or implications); and oriented toward identifying practical solutions. Applicants were juniors within Columbia College, the School of General Studies, or the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Sciences who had planned to conduct a senior thesis and fulfill their department’s requirements for a senior thesis. Students with an expected summer earnings contribution, as determined by their financial aid award, were eligible for additional support on a case-by-case basis.

What is the Global Policy Initiative?

The Columbia Global Policy Initiative, as conceived by President Lee C. Bollinger and led by founding director Professor Michael W. Doyle, brings together eminent Columbia faculty members and distinguished policy professionals from the widest range of relevant disciplines. These experts not only address global problems comprehensively, building on the relevant range of scholarly expertise, but also find effective ways of influencing global policy by engaging stakeholders and policymakers. Through this research, the Initiative hopes to provide an intellectual basis for policy, thereby helping to bridge the gap between scholarship and global policymaking.

What is global, policy-oriented research?

The Columbia Global Policy Initiative seeks to support research that is truly global in nature — addressing problems that impact not just one country or region but that reflect the challenges of the globalized world in which we now live. All projects must also have a strong and practical policy application. While it is not expected that students achieve all goals set out in their research, their proposal and thesis must have specific policy targets and recommendations that add value to the research field.

What kinds of projects are eligible for funding?
  • Applied, searching for effective solutions that can be implemented;
  • Research-based, drawing on in-depth, rigorous analyses;
  • Global in nature, having cross-border origins, consequences, or implications;
  • Responsive to the needs and voices of stakeholders;
  • Including but not limited to fieldwork or laboratory research.
What kind of funding is available?

All awards will be made on a competitive basis. Fellows will be selected by their department. Award amounts will be determined individually by project with a maximum award of $3,000-$4,000 per fellow. Funds can be used for domestic or international research.

View the next tab for Submission Guidelines.

Submission Guidelines

Submission Guidelines

Receipt of CGPI fellowship funds is contingent upon four requirements:

1) The proposed project must receive Institutional Review Board (IRB) and Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) approval (if required);

To determine if your project requires approval, please contact Lisa Hollibaugh, Dean of Academic Planning and Administration at Columbia College, at lisa.hollibaugh@columbia.edu or schedule an appointment with the Morningside IRB Office or IACUC Office.

2) Each fellow traveling internationally must:

  • Apply and receive School Sponsorship of his/her travel and submit his/her travel itinerary to the Undergraduate Travel Review Committee for approval (cc-seas.columbia.edu/travelpolicy);
    • For assistance, please contact the Undergraduate Travel Review Committee at utrc@columbia.edu;  
    • NOTE — A decision from the Undergraduate Travel Review Committee may take up to four weeks.
  • Register his/her travel using Columbia University’s Global Travel Portal (globaltravel.columbia.edu/content/register-a-trip);
  • Complete a Pre-Departure Orientation online at least two weeks prior to travel.

3) Each fellow must present her/his research plan at the Undergraduate Global Policy Fellowship Research Colloquium in April 2017, as well as present her/his thesis results at next year’s Colloquium;

4) Each fellow must write a one-page research report summarizing her/his thesis findings upon the completion of her/his project.

INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARD (IRB): The Institutional Review Board (IRB) is responsible for ensuring that research involving human subjects is conducted in accordance with all ethical, federal, and institutional guidelines. According to Columbia University policy, all student research involving human subjects must be reviewed by IRB to ensure that it meets all relevant guidelines. A project may also be categorized as exempt research, but it still must be submitted to IRB to determine whether or not it is in fact exempt. Students cannot themselves determine their exemption status, nor can their faculty advisor or Director of Undergraduate Studies. This is the responsibility of the IRB office. Research may only begin upon receiving IRB approval, and CGPI Fellowship funds will not be disbursed until confirmation of IRB approval or exemption is received.

To determine if your project requires IRB approval, please contact Lisa Hollibaugh, Dean of Academic Planning and Administration at Columbia College, at lisa.hollibaugh@columbia.edu or schedule an appointment with the Morningside IRB Office.

For further information, please visit the Columbia University IRB website. To learn more about student researchers, please see the IRB policy and guidance on students as researchers.

INSTITUTIONAL ANIMAL CARE AND USE COMMITTEE (IACUC): The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) is responsible for ensuring that research involving non-human animal subjects is conducted in accordance with all ethical, federal, and institutional guidelines. All student research involving non-human animal subjects must be reviewed by IACUC to ensure that it meets all relevant guidelines. Research may only begin upon receiving IACUC approval, and CGPI Fellowship funds will not be disbursed until confirmation of IACUC approval or exemption is received.

For assistance, students can contact the IACUC at iacuc@columbia.edu or 212-305-2404 to discuss their projects. For further information, please visit the Columbia University IACUC website.

View the next tab for Previous Winners.

Previous Winners

Previous Winners

2018 Undergraduate Global Policy Research Fellows
  • Max Binder—Columbia College: "Shopping Centers & the Fetishism of the City"
  • Josue David Chavez—Columbia College: "Translation Aesthetics: Making Legible the Home-yet-to-come as an Instance of the Event Before the Multiplication of Labor"
  • Timothy Diovanni—Columbia College: "Romantic Naturalization: How French Adapters Transformed Schubert and his Lieder for the 19th Century Salon"
  • Anish Gawande—Columbia College: "377: An ethnography"
  • Minji Hong—School of General Studies: "The Canadian Success Story: Private sponsorship under scrutiny"
  • Matthew Malone—Columbia College: "Adamawa Language Documentation in Nigeria, Cameroon, and Central African Republic"
  • Benjamin Jared Preneta—Columbia College: "The Trajectory of Local Conflict and International Conflict Resolution in the DRC"
  • Jesse Thorson—Columbia College: "Light for the World: Investigating electricity access in Nicaragua"

2017 Undergraduate Global Policy Research Fellows
  • April Yon Soo Cho—Columbia College: "Korea in the 21st Century: the Role of Transnational Labor in an Era of Globalization"
  • Daniela Dos Santos Quaresma—School of General Studies: "Western Secular Discourse & Islamic Radicalization"
  • Nadine Fattaleh—Columbia College: "Global Interventions in Addressing the Needs of Syrian Refugee Youth"
  • Amelia (Emmalina) Glinskis—Columbia College: "Understanding Oil Palm Expansion in the Peruvian Amazon"
  • Aiden William Slavin—Columbia College: "A Study of Statelessness: Identifying Solutions through the Case of the Syrian Migrant Crisis in Jordan"
  • Elana Sulakshana—Columbia College: "Relocation Policy of Alaskan Native Communities at the Federal, State, and Local Levels"
  • Jonathan Young—Columbia College: "Assessing Risks of Air Pollution for Urban Bicycle Riders"

2016 Undergraduate Global Policy Research Fellows
  • Alexandra Baer Chan—Columbia College: "The Thunder Dragon Kingdom to the Land of the Free: Identity and Resettlement Policy for Bhutanese Refugees"
  • Eyvana Maria Bengochea—Columbia College: "Shift in Curatorial Practices by Non-Traditional Curators for Highly Political Ends"
  • Eleanor Goerss—Columbia College: "History and Art of Religious Identity in 17th Century Dutch Cities"
  • Elena Anastasia Goldstein—Columbia College: "Universal Access to All Knowledge, Public Information, and Public Libraries"
  • Mallory McKeon—Columbia College: "Effect of Marine Protected Areas and Marine Ecotourism on Coral Reef Biodiversity and Ecosystems"
  • Joseph O'Donnell—Columbia College: "Consequences and Resolutions of Intersecting National and Linguistic Borders in Catalonia"
  • Nikita Perumal—School of General Studies: "Human Rights Protections for Cross-Border Climate Change 'Refugees'"
  • Zoey Poll—Columbia College: "Mosque Construction in Global Cities of the West: Acceptance and Spaces for Cultural Exchange"
  • Jonah Reider—Columbia College: "Mapping Worker Cooperatives to Social and Political Contexts"